Ofsted Good GP Colour

Birmingham Road, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, DY10 2BY

School Office - 01562 822929

Senior Curriculum

The curriculum policy at Holy Trinity School relates directly to the School’s Mission Statement.

Pupils are at the heart of the educational process and should be encouraged to participate fully in the life of the school. All pupils regardless of age, gender, ability and background should experience personal fulfilment through the curriculum. Thus, our curriculum is guided by the following aims and principles:

  • The need for breadth and balance
  • The need for flexibility and choice (particularly at KS4 and 5)
  • The need for coherence and progression
  • The need to provide opportunities for all pupils to learn and achieve
  • The need to prepare pupils for the opportunities and the responsibilities of adult life
  • The recognition that the curriculum must be continuously evolving, forward looking and under constant review

Curriculum 

1. Our emphasis is on providing a rounded education with excellence as our priority, not only in academic standards, but also in the whole range of curricular and extracurricular work. We aim to provide an extended and enriched curriculum through the timetabled curriculum and a wide range of activities offered outside normal school.

2. At KS3 and 4 most of the curriculum is delivered in separate subject lessons but citizenship, careers, sex and relationships education and preparation for the world of work are packaged together in programmes run by specialist and Form teachers.

3. Teachers cater for individual pupils’ interests and capabilities through scaffolded activities and targeted support in timetabled lessons and study support.

4. To aid the transition between KS2 and KS3 there is a programme of liaison meetings between KS2 and KS3 teachers. In addition there is a bridging course based on the KS3 programmes of study which begins after the Year 6 tests in May.

5. One way of helping pupils to move onto KS4 is to anticipate the style and content of a range of qualifications in Year 9 lessons.  Thus year 9 schemes of work in non core subjects include aspects of GCSE courses, particularly in the second half of the summer term.

 

  • Art
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computing
  • Drama
  • English
  • Enrichment
  • French
  • Geography
  • Graphic & 3D Design
  • History
  • Home Ec/Textiles
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • PE
  • Physics
  • RS
  • Spanish

Art

Year 7 - In Year 7 pupils are introduced the Formal Elements of Art and these are used a basis of the projects they do. The theme for first project is Geometric Animals. Pupils explore line, shape, colour and pattern exploring a variety of tasks and looking at a range of different artists. They are introduced to the basics of colour theory and colour mixing using paint and developing their ability to mix a range of colours and use a paint brush sensitively. They work towards a final piece where they create their own geometric animal incorporating mixed media and demonstrating the skills they have developed. The second theme pupils explore is landscapes where they study the work of David Hockney and  Vincent Van Gogh looking at their mark making techniques. Pupils use a range of media such as oil pastels, watercolour crayons and collage to create a range of postcards using landscapes of their choice.

Year 8 - In year pupils are introduced to the world of bugs! The first project ‘ A Bug’s Life’ pupils look at a range of bugs and produce a range of studies using a variety of media. They are introduced to different artists who have been inspired by insects and develop ideas in their sketchbook. For their final piece pupils are challenged to design and make a 3D bug from recycled material. The second theme pupils explore is Sweet treats, where they have the opportunity to develop their drawing and painting skills exploring the topic of Food. Pupils take inspiration from Sarah Graham and Wayne Thiebuad exploring different compositions of sweet treats. They are introduced to different printing techniques and experiment with them to enhance their ideas before producing a final piece of their choice.

Year 9 - In Year 9 students develop a variety of more complex skills and techniques and gain a greater insight into what is expected in GCSE Art. Previous skills are built upon and honed, in particular a greater emphasis on contextual analysis. The first theme covered in Year 9 is ‘Architecture’, focussing on developing drawing skills in one and two point perspective. Equipped with these skills, students experiment with a variety of 2D and 3D mixed media techniques influenced by their artist research and analysis. Students then explore compositional techniques enabling them to proceed to creating their final piece. The second theme of ‘Human Figure’ allows the students to build on their experience of a broad variety of materials and working methods and continue to improve upon these. Having perfected individual drawing and painting skills, students embark upon a more in-depth look at the many different approaches to representing the human figure in Art.  Developing independent research into the figure, students will investigate the work of artists Da Vinci, Henry Moore, Alberto Giacometti, David Oliveira and Diane Komoter to produce a number of figure drawings concentrating on proportion. Students are challenged to produce final sculpture of a wire figure in an action pose enabling them to realise their 2D drawings into 3D forms.

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Science in years 7 and 8 at Holy Trinity School

(We begin the GCSE course at the start of year 9 , please see the Full Options Booklet 2020 - 2022 below for details)

In the science department we strive to create enjoyable and interesting lessons that feel different from other subjects because we incorporate practical or other kinaesthetic activities whenever we can. Our objective is to connect learning to real-life contexts so that our young people are able to have informed opinions on the scientific issues they will encounter throughout their lifetimes. The science teachers and support staff work together as a team to deliver lessons of the highest quality.

We are very lucky at HTS that science is given such prominence in the curriculum at key stage 3. We have 50 % more lesson time than the government’s minimum recommendation, as our students have 3 lessons of Biology, 3 of Chemistry and 3 of Physics over the 2 week timetable. A huge advantage we have is that these lessons are delivered by specialised Biology, Chemistry and Physics staff. Students benefit from their teachers’ in-depth knowledge and expertise. The confidence and creativity of the teaching leads to confidence and excellent progress in learning.

We follow the Oxford KS3 “Activate” Science course which provides a great platform from which to build for the GCSE courses which begin in year 9. We invest in an on-line learning platform called Kerboodle and students are able to access resources and the text books from home to support their independent study. The following table gives a brief outline of the topic areas covered in each science in years 7 and 8.

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Science in years 7 and 8 at Holy Trinity School

(We begin the GCSE course at the start of year 9 , please see the Full Options Booklet 2020 - 2022 below for details)

In the science department we strive to create enjoyable and interesting lessons that feel different from other subjects because we incorporate practical or other kinaesthetic activities whenever we can. Our objective is to connect learning to real-life contexts so that our young people are able to have informed opinions on the scientific issues they will encounter throughout their lifetimes. The science teachers and support staff work together as a team to deliver lessons of the highest quality.

We are very lucky at HTS that science is given such prominence in the curriculum at key stage 3. We have 50 % more lesson time than the government’s minimum recommendation, as our students have 3 lessons of Biology, 3 of Chemistry and 3 of Physics over the 2 week timetable. A huge advantage we have is that these lessons are delivered by specialised Biology, Chemistry and Physics staff. Students benefit from their teachers’ in-depth knowledge and expertise. The confidence and creativity of the teaching leads to confidence and excellent progress in learning.

We follow the Oxford KS3 “Activate” Science course which provides a great platform from which to build for the GCSE courses which begin in year 9. We invest in an on-line learning platform called Kerboodle and students are able to access resources and the text books from home to support their independent study. The following table gives a brief outline of the topic areas covered in each science in years 7 and 8.

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Computing

Computing is taught from EYFS to Key Stage 3 to enable students to develop both computational thinking and creativity to understand and adapt to the changing world. The subject links to mathematics, science, design and technology, among others. Within lessons, students are taught how digital systems work, the principles of information and computing, while utilising this knowledge through programming in different languages. Students are also taught how to use a range or programs to convey their thoughts and ideas through information and communication technology, skills vital for future employment.
The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils

• can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
• can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
• can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
• are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

Subject content

Pupils are taught to:

• design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems
• understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem
• use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures [for example, lists, tables or arrays]; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions
• understand simple Boolean logic [for example, AND, OR and NOT] and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers [for example, binary addition, and conversion between binary and decimal]
• understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
• understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits
• undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users
• create, reuse, revise and repurpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability
• understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct, and know how to report concerns

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Drama

Drama is offered for senior students in years 7-9, with a focus on laying the foundation for further study at GCSE and A level. From the Greeks to the 20th century, each year explores a significant period in the development of theatre, analysing the plays and their social significance, performance styles/practices of the era and advances in staging and production.

This is achieved through alternating lessons in Drama, where the plays are studied, with Performing Arts, which develops those plays through acting, voice, dance, and technical production.
There is an additional 8 week Drama course in year 9 on the Creative Arts carousel, where students will explore a play and practitioner of the 20th /21st centuries, using Edexcel attainment objectives and assessment, giving access to a taster of study at GCSE level.

Year 9 carousel unit
FROM PAGE TO STAGE
Objectives:
Candidates should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the following skills:
Body Language; Gesture; Facial Expression; Exaggeration; Posture; Tone; pitch; volume; pace of voice; proxemics; levels; movement; blocking to create a character and communicate meaning.

To be able to demonstrate the following knowledge and techniques:
Entrances and exits; blocking; levels; stage configurations; staging choices.
To be able to read, learn, rehearse and perform a small piece of script (monologue or duologue)
To consider the audience when creating drama.

To be able to give reflective and evaluative comments on their own and others’ work.

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Reading, DEAR, SPG and non-fiction

The English curriculum covers both English Language and Literature. We cover a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts from a range of time periods.

During one lesson every week, the students have a SPG (Spelling, punctuation and grammar) and DEAR lesson to revisit, consolidate and build on the work done in Prep/primary and especially in year 6 for the SATs. This knowledge is important for GCSE and if it is not regularly revisited, it can be forgotten. DEAR stands for Drop Everything And Read. This is an essential part of the lesson as it enables English teachers to observe what the students are reading, the range of texts covered and offer alternatives / more challenge, if required.

The lessons are structured to allow for private reading time and SPG work.

The SPG work focuses on a particular part of speech, sentence structure or piece of punctuation. The term is introduced or revisited and students then practice identifying and using the term or skill themselves. They then demonstrate their understanding through parsing a sentence or using the sentence construction or piece of punctuation correctly. Spelling tests for key terms and vocabulary are also conducted in this time, where appropriate.

SPG Lessons

Autumn 1 and 2

SPG: Parts of speech

Spring 1 and 2

SPG: sentences + syntax

Summer 1

SPG: punctuation

Reading

Reading is the most important skill our children can have. It is the foundation block that allows children to access ALL of their subjects at school. It increases general knowledge, creates cultural understanding, improves empathy, is a pleasurable activity but above all, it is the single most important factor in improving your child’s academic results and life chances. UNESCO researched what the single most important factor was in children succeeding and achieving what they are capable of. The resounding answer, above everything else, was whether they read for pleasure or not.

We feel that regular reading is essential at home and at school, as this can often be overlooked once children enter year 7. It is an expectation that students bring a reading book with them to school every day. This can be fiction or non-fiction but the students should be reading a range of texts and genres. We are also very passionate that students do not get ‘stuck in a rut’ and that they are challenged to read books that are suitable to their ability, rather than always bringing in the same ‘safe’ text that they always revert back to.
To enable us to support students of all abilities, we test the reading ages of all students when they enter year 7. We are then able to support and intervene where it is appropriate, and improve the progress of all students across all subjects.
Students read twice a week in form time and this allows staff to monitor the challenge and range of texts that they are reading. This is an important part of form time, as it allows individual discussion of themes and issues that may arise in the texts.

 

 

 

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Enrichment

Enrichment is a vital part of life in the Sixth Form, allowing for some "down time" away from the more formal classroom environment. Traditionally timetabled for Wednesday afternoon's, fun activities such as mixed sports, swimming, volunteer work or helping out in another section of the school are all encouraged. Sixth Form students are able to access some extra-curricular provision by taking part in exercise or by supporting other members of our community. This allows for development of personal skills such as team building and communication as well as general well-being.

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French
 
French is studied throughout the school from Reception through to A Level and remains a strength of the school with the vast majority of students opting for GCSE with excellent results for many years,   We follow the Dynamo course in Years 7-9 and this is a lively and engaging new course which allows students to explore both the language and cultures of France and other Francophone countries.  At GCSE we prepare for the AQA examination and follow the Studio AQA GCSE course.  We concentrate on the four skills of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking and students enjoy practising the language through role play activities, games and songs in the younger years, with a growing emphasis on translating and writing from Year 7 onwards. 
We enjoy a residential visit to a chateau in Northern France for Years 6-7 where we experience French life first-hand and visit the local area.  This is a most enjoyable educational visit and proves extremely popular with pupils.

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Geography

The Geography department aims to inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. We believe that teaching should engage, motivate and equip students with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and the natural and human environments around them and will gain them a deeper understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes that shape many of the environments around them. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and how they may change over time.

The content of the curriculum aims to be progressive and is based on consolidating and revisiting content over time to secure progress over time. The nature of the school means that Geographical knowledge can be built-upon right from KS1 through KS2, to secure a foundation for young people to progress with concepts through the KS3 curriculum that accelerates progress right the way through to KS4 and hopefully, KS5.
The aim of our curriculum is to:

  • provide students with a firm foundation of geographical knowledge to succeed through high attainment and aspiration
  • enlighten students to the contemporary issues shaping the world around us
  • make our students aware and proud of the local community and the wider world

Our GCSE curriculum:

The aim of our GCSE curriculum is to build upon the foundation of geographical knowledge developed through the KS2 and KS3 curriculum to ensure success for all in the AQA GCSE geography course and their future lives. Our core textbook is ‘GCSE Geography for AQA’ by OUP.


Our A level curriculum:

The aim of our A level curriculum is to build upon the foundation of geographical knowledge developed through the KS3 and GCSE curricula to ensure success for all in AQA A level geography courses and their future lives. We aim to make links between A level geography and the academic geography curriculum at Universities.

 

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Graphic Design

Year 7 - In Year 7 our aim is to provide opportunities for students to gain an understanding of how Graphics fits in to the world outside of school. Students are introduced to the design process whereby ideas become high quality products that are fit for their intended purpose. Learners complete one project over approximately 8 weeks, focussing on ‘Gift Bag Packaging’, enabling them to develop their technical knowledge and practical skills through researching, designing, making, modifying and evaluating. The project covers past and present designs, production methods, paper engineering, 2D and 3D design developing both digital and traditional drawing techniques.

Year 8 - In year 8 we begin to extend our knowledge and skills using a wider range of tools, materials and techniques within the area of Graphics. Students complete one project over approximately 8 weeks, focussing on ‘Fragrance Packaging’, building on prior knowledge and skills, and enabling them to realise their own creative ideas and produce high quality, attractive and functional products. This project covers a variety of both artistic and industrial processes and methods of manufacture, including packaging nets, isometric and drawing techniques, design development and investigations into one-off, batch and mass production.

Year 9 - In Year 9 our aim is to nurture and inspire the future generation of designers and to lay a strong foundation for GCSE Graphic Design. We aim to ensure that students learn the necessary skills for GCSE and have the knowledge to enable them to make correct subject choices. In Graphics, students independently design and make high quality products. Learners complete one project over approximately 8 weeks, focussing on ‘Festival Branding and Tickets’ which involves them developing and using in-depth subject knowledge, selecting and working with a wide variety of tools, equipment and techniques, and responding to a design brief in original and innovative ways. Students are challenged to create an effective corporate identity for a Festival of their own choice and produce a quality ticketing product to promote it; thus encouraging them to experiment with ideas and explore new and alternative methods for making graphic products. The project covers designer and artist research, design and presentation skills including rendering and graphic techniques, typography theory, modelling and assembling their final graphic product.

 

3D Design

In year 7 and 8 the students will experience working with different materials that they can model three dimensionally with. They will use wood to do this but they will produce models with different materials like paper and card before this stage.
The student’s final project will be a wooden box where they will primarily focus on finger joints. The students will use a range of equipment and tools during the process.
The constructed box will then be decorated by using a choice of skills. These will include pyrography, decoupage or hand painting.

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History

Curriculum intent

Rationale

Students should have enquiring minds, a desire to find out more about what has happened, why, what motivated people and whether ‘things’ have got better. Students should be challenged by studying aspects that are upsetting and shocking to recognise the above.

Ambition

They should be able to express themselves eloquently and support their opinions and judgements - the key to their futures in the ‘big, wide world’.

Concepts

Students should be able to investigate the past independently and use a variety of sources and other experiences including educational visits in order to study the past.

Curriculum implementation

Subject leadership

History is led in the Senior school by a teacher with 15 years experience, of which 11 years at leadership. There is an enthusiastic team in Key Stage 3 including an avid enthusiast of the Ancient and Medieval worlds. In Primary years there is a designated lead who co-ordinates the history topics in line with National Curriculum guidelines.

Subject knowledge

You can never know everything about the past, but having followed the national curriculum as a framework, it is important to study the past chronologically to consider change, continuity, significance and impact. In addition research skills and using sources are crucial to furthering and developing knowledge both as teachers and students.

Equitable delivery

All pupils at KS1, KS2 and KS3 study history. Pupils can choose in Year 9 whether to opt to study History GCSE and a full range of abilities study History at both GCSE and A level. If students are interested in studying A level History without prior study their GCSE English attainment is considered instead.

Planning the progression model

Both knowledge and skills underpin the History curriculum. Some topics, especially the Tudors are explicitly taught three times in the Senior school, each time in increasing depth, and at A level greater breadth. The A level topics deepen and broaden knowledge at GCSE. KS3 topics prepare students for study of GCSE, given them a good chronological overview and preparation in key skills which will be assessed at GCSE.

Please refer to the curriculum map for further details of the topics delivered. 

Breadth and depth

There are several depth studies including WWI, Elizabeth I, Fascist Italy and breadth studies including Medieval control and life and Health and the People.

Assessment

At KS3 assessments reflect and build the skills and question stems used at GCSE including source and explanation skills. At all key stages assessments are completed after each topic and scaffolding is provided for those pupils who require it.

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Home Economics

Year 7 - In year 7 pupils are introduced to the Home Economics room and the range of equipment within it. Health and safety is the focus as pupils learn to use a sharp knife safely and practise their chopping skills with a range of ingredients. Pupils learn how to use the oven independently and cook a range of products. The aim through the rotation is that they are confident using the equipment and the room safely and hopefully they can start to think about adapting recipes. Pupils research issues linked to sustainability, food miles and food waste. Products they make include French bread pizza, fruit crumble, chicken fajitas and mini carrot cakes.

Year 8 - In year 8 the focus moves on from using equipment safely to preparing, cooking and storing food safely. They learn about food poisoning and ways to prevent it. They start to cook more complex dishes which involve more elements such as spaghetti Bolognese and are encouraged to adapt recipes more by introducing more ingredients. Pupils learn how to make bread and this is skill is then adapted to pizza. To link into the KS4 curriculum pupils conduct an experiment involving cakes to try to gain an understanding of the function of the ingredients. This then leads to making cakes using different methods and finally onto a showstopper. Pupils design, make and decorate a showstopper celebration cake for a person and occasion of their choice. Pupils research different cultural and moral beliefs linked to food.

Year 9 - Pupils build on their Year 8 skills producing more complex dishes, often independently and by adapting recipes. The focus of this unit is on different user groups so pupils research the nutritional needs of different age groups and plan a meal for one group, this task is linked to the KS4 curriculum. They also conduct an experiment as they would at GCSE level where they look at pastry and how different fats change its texture. They use these pastry-making skills to make a pie of their choice. Other dishes they make include cottage pie, Swiss roll and cinnamon buns.

Textiles

Year 7 - In year 7 we introduce our students to the material area of Textile design. We primarily learn about decorating fabrics using dyes, printing inks, embroidery techniques and applying embellishments like beads, buttons and sequins. Students design an ‘Under the Sea’ inspired picture which will be produced whilst learning new techniques. We produce samples of tie and dye, batik, stencil and string printing, hand embroidery stitching and students will be introduced to using the sewing machine. Once they feel they have mastered sewing this way they will take their ‘Driving Test’! Other key skills like designing, researching and presentation techniques are an integral part of this project.

Year 8 - In year 8 we begin to extend our knowledge and skills in using the sewing machine as a tool for artistic development. We design and make an Applique picture based on ‘Inspirational Landscapes’. We use recycled fabrics to create a decorative panel which will be embellished using hand and machine embroidery to add details in the landscape. Buttons, beads and sequins can be used to further enhance the picture and students can extend their skills by using other textile materials like Angelina fibres and foils. They will again, continue to focus on becoming a designer who can present ideas artistically.

Year 9 - In year 9 we embark on our first ‘Fashion’ project. The brief is to design and make a pair of ‘surf’ inspired board shorts. Skills include developing repeat print patterns, which are inspired by a tropical theme. Students will create lino and stencil prints based on their chosen design. They experiment on paper and fabric before printing over their chosen piece of polycotton. Using paper patterns, they will then cut out their pieces and will construct the shorts neatly and to size. An elasticated waist is added and some students like to add pockets and personal logos. As ever, designing, presentation and research sheets are an integral part of the project.

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Mathematics

Our vision for Mathematics at Holy Trinity:

  • A KS3 curriculum that has substantial rigour and depth with frequent opportunities to refine, improve and revisit.
  • Academic results which lead the achievement of the school, that are consistently significantly above the national average so that students can compete at the highest national and international level.
  • A culture of success with outstanding teaching and learning that is balanced with robust and rigorous tracking, monitoring and intervention.
  • To inspire an interest and curiosity in mathematics that equips students with skills for life and encourages a large number of students to choose the subject for A Level.
  • To promote a curiosity about mathematics that sees students want to find out how the skills they learn can be applied to real life or can be seen in real life.
  • To develop children's proficiency and working knowledge of mathematical concepts so that they can apply those skills beyond their maths lessons.

Teachers who are:

  • Passionate, reflective, inspiring, creative and devise opportunities for students to take risks.
  • Highly skilled, have high expectations and have an excellent subject knowledge.
  • Proactive and consistent with issues in the classroom.
  • Providing high quality written and verbal feedback that enables students to fill any gaps and make rapid and sustained progress.
  • Using data effectively to enable students to inform personalised planning so that students can achieve their potential and make maximum progress whatever their individual needs.
  • Informed by research, reading and action-research – including exam board reports, CPD etc.
  • Invested in their own professional development in a manner which drives what they do on a daily basis in the classroom and spurs them on to obsessively want to be better.

Learners who are:

  • Able to show clearly how they reach an answer both in their written work and class discussions
  • Curious and able to draw on an extensive prior knowledge and apply it to new situations
  • Invested in their own achievement, progress and who are working harder than their teachers.
  • Resilient, able to accept constructive criticism and reflective enough to identify their next steps.
  • Engaged and have the ability to take on board different approaches to solving the same problem.
  • Lifelong mathematicians.

All mathematics GCSEs cover the same topic areas, however, the modular AQA allows students to achieve a grade 6 by completing one paper at Higher tier. All of the papers overlap as regards the theory taught and therefore taking the exams at the end of year 11 allows for both maturation and consolidation to achieve the best results possible. The scheme of assessment has a modular structure within each of the three tiers available, namely Foundation and Higher. At each tier the specification is designed for the targeted grades available, and it offers candidates the best opportunity to show what they know and can do. The range of grades available at each tier is as follows:

Higher Tier - Grades 4 - 9
Foundation Tier - Grades 1 - 5

Students should only be entered for the Higher Tier if they are capable of achieving 6 - 9. For candidates who are borderline 4/5, the Foundation tier is advised. For those students achieving exceptional results on the Foundation paper, the Grade 6/7 can be awarded.

 

What's assessed

Content from any part of the specification may be assessed

How it's assessed

●        written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes

●        80 marks

●        non-calculator (1); calculator (2 and 3)

●        33⅓% of the GCSE Mathematics assessment

Questions

A mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems. The mathematical demand increases as a student progresses through the paper.

 

All content can be assessed on any of the three question papers. As such, some questions will draw together elements of maths from different topic areas.

The weighting of the topic areas has been prescribed by Ofqual and is common to all exam boards. The table below shows the approximate weightings of the topic areas for the overall tier of assessment, not for each individual question paper.

Topic Area

Foundation Tier (%)

Higher Tier (%)

Number

25

15

Algebra

20

30

Ratio

25

20

Geometry

15

20

Probability and statistics (combined)

15

15

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Music

We in the Music Department want to educate, develop and inspire students to achieve their full musical potential and provide them the skills for lifelong enjoyment of music.


We are committed to the highest standards of musicianship by combining innovative and individualized programs to meet the needs of our students and families thereby contributing to their musical success.
Music at HTS is a valued part of the curriculum from Reception through to Year 9 and thereafter as an option. Whilst we are able to boast a plethora of talented musicians, we believe the true purpose of music education is not necessarily to create professional musicians. It is to create more complete human beings who are critical thinkers, who have curious minds and who can lead productive lives. We believe Music is the glue, bonding subjects together, for it is not only mathematical and physically demanding requiring great co-ordination, it is also a science, a foreign language and of course an art.


Students are taught how to read music and are encouraged to perform to their peers as well as in regular school concerts. Popular subjects we cover from Year 7 are film music, musical theatre and computer and video game music.
The Music Department boasts a strong Prep Choir, recorder consort and developing orchestra, which regularly perform locally in the Kidderminster community as well as further afield in Birmingham.


As preparation for GCSE work we study a number of different areas of music and begin to use technical musical language: Film music, Musical Theatre, Popular Song and Fusions. We explore pieces of music by expanding the students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, musical contexts and musical language so that they can understand and make critical judgements about the music. Later in academic year we start to develop comparative and evaluative skills which can then be used in composition and performance work.

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PE & Swimming

Sport is highly valued at Holy Trinity and as a result, the students achieve tremendous results. Holy Trinity reached District, County and National representation in a range of sports.
Within the PE department, we offer a broad range of sports and activities for boys and girls, aged 4-18 years with specialist staff who aspire each child to participate and achieve.
Students have virtuous opportunities for personal achievement, with the emphasis placed on acquiring skills, whilst nurturing individual talents to ensure they reach their highest potential. 

Students also have the opportunity to attend regular practices, which help improve skills and techniques and provide a firm foundation for training and subsequent progression.

We offer a wide range of sports within our extended curriculum; Cross-country, Swimming, Biathlons, Netball, Football, Rugby, Hockey, Rounders, Athletics, Cricket, Tennis and Handball.

Our refurbished swimming pool, officially re-opened in May 2006, has proved to be a great success and is the home venue for the prestigious Wyre Forest Swim Team. Swimming has always been an important part of our school as children swim weekly from Reception years upwards. Holy Trinity School is delighted to be one of only a handful of schools in the UK to be granted ‘Swim England Swim School’ status and, unlike many other schools, offers swimming for stages 1-10 within the school’s regular curriculum. Holy Trinity School offers fully accredited Learn to Swim and Aquatic Skills Framework Awards through its national curriculum lessons and extra-curricular school clubs for pupils from Reception to Year 8. Able to teach children from three-years upwards, the learn to swim framework is aimed at children from five-years onwards, with the school offering additional learn to swim classes open to non-Holy Trinity pupils now available on Saturday afternoons for Stages 1 – 10. The head of swimming at Holy Trinity (Nicola Bainbridge) is a Swim England tutor, and works domestically and internationally to develop swimming teachers and coaches. She is a consultant to organisations setting up new Learn to Swim programmes.

Having the ability to offer recognised Swim England awards ensures children at Holy Trinity develop confidence in and around the water, with consistent skills taught and quality of teaching assured as standards are approved by the national governing body making Holy Trinity a class leader in school swimming provision, with results that speak for themselves. Being able to extend swimming lessons to non-pupils is also an exciting development.
Stage 1-10 lessons are available to non-Holy Trinity pupils on Saturdays during term time, between 2.15pm - 6.15pm, further details are available by contacting: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Holy Trinity recognises swimming as a vital life skill and is passionate about ensuring all pupils exceed the minimum national curriculum requirements by the end of year 6, gaining a range of water skills in a fun and exciting manner."

The department offers club links in a variety of sport and activities what are striving to allow the students to take sport to another level and reach Excellence.
All students are encouraged to be competitive and enjoy sport to the highest level they can achieve and learn from experience.
A range of fixtures and events give our pupils countless opportunities to succeed. Talented and committed staff works with our pupils to achieve these outcomes.

We offer both GCSE and A level PE within phase 3.

Miss D Gunn - Head of Senior PE
Miss S Williams – Head of Prep PE
Mrs Goddard – PE teacher
Miss Withers - PE/Maths Teacher
Mrs J Thomas - PE Teacher
Mr A Rex - PE Teacher
Mr A Gilbert - PE Teacher
Mrs N Bainbridge – Swim Teacher & Coach
Miss E Bainbridge – Swim Teacher
Mrs H Taylor – Swim Teacher
Mrs Crocker – Swim Teacher
Mr R Beardsmore – Science/PE Teacher

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Science in years 7 and 8 at Holy Trinity School

(We begin the GCSE course at the start of year 9 , please see the Full Options Booklet 2020 - 2022 below for details)

In the science department we strive to create enjoyable and interesting lessons that feel different from other subjects because we incorporate practical or other kinaesthetic activities whenever we can. Our objective is to connect learning to real-life contexts so that our young people are able to have informed opinions on the scientific issues they will encounter throughout their lifetimes. The science teachers and support staff work together as a team to deliver lessons of the highest quality.

We are very lucky at HTS that science is given such prominence in the curriculum at key stage 3. We have 50 % more lesson time than the government’s minimum recommendation, as our students have 3 lessons of Biology, 3 of Chemistry and 3 of Physics over the 2 week timetable. A huge advantage we have is that these lessons are delivered by specialised Biology, Chemistry and Physics staff. Students benefit from their teachers’ in-depth knowledge and expertise. The confidence and creativity of the teaching leads to confidence and excellent progress in learning.

We follow the Oxford KS3 “Activate” Science course which provides a great platform from which to build for the GCSE courses which begin in year 9. We invest in an on-line learning platform called Kerboodle and students are able to access resources and the text books from home to support their independent study. The following table gives a brief outline of the topic areas covered in each science in years 7 and 8.

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Religious Studies

In their Religious Studies lessons, students will be encouraged to explore a variety of religious, philosophical and ethical beliefs. They will be challenged with questions about values, meaning, purpose and truth, which will enable them to develop their own attitudes towards religious issues and enhance their analytical and critical thinking skills.

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Spanish

Currently we are teaching Spanish at GCSE until 2022 this will be the final year that the subject will be taught.  GCSE Spanish offers the pupils the opportunity to not only learn a new language but to experience the culture of this widely spoken language.  They can experience traditions of both Spain and the Latin American continent.  The GCSE focuses on 3 themes covering topics as diverse as general Spanish looking at relationships, families, shopping, eating out to the more complex topic of environment and future plans both in education and work.  At Holy Trinity students follow the AQA syllabus and can take either Higher or Foundation level exams at the end of year 11.

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Timetabling the curriculum

The curriculum at KS3, KS4 and KS5 is based on 30 X 55 minute periods per week.

Please see below documents for curriculum offering in KS4.

 

Below are external links to the examining bodies for more information on the specification of the KS4 courses.

OCR
AQA
Edexcel
Cambridge Nationals